(ART Bahrain Across Borders, Bahrain International Exhibition Centre (Kingdom Of Bahrain) from 14th March – 18th March 2018)

“This series employs a new technique developed by the artist and is a culmination of over seven years of research and experimentation. Composed of a combination of metal, paint and various mixed media on canvas, the elements come together to forge intriguing, highly reflective works that tantalise viewers with an uncanny luminosity.”


Artist’s Statement:

‘There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterward you can remove all traces of reality.’ -Pablo Picasso

Art is a “reflection” of its surrounding culture, a face of modern culture where shiny new objects reflect life around it, epitomising the industrial culture of gadgets and instant gratification. Metallics reflect everything surrounding them and deflect any allusions to the Artist’s interior.

But can a work of art be physically different for every person looking at it?

There are no “laws of beauty” involved. One is prompted to think about the nature of art, of looking at art, of humanity, of our times, of ourselves. The immense reflective surface are like minds, in the sense that the mind observes the universe, and models it. We approach art not for worship, but for catharsis; not to see something else, but to see ourselves.

Every work of art deserves as much thoughtful and empathic attention as we can afford to give it; hasty dismissal deprives us of aesthetic experiences.

Scientists noted that our preference for shiny things is linked to our need for water. They believe that our fascination with shininess has deep evolutionary roots and that we are attracted to things that serve a purpose for fulfilling our innate needs. But it can also be said that shiny things catch our attention, because they catch the light. Our desire to behold shiny things is natural and powerful. In a sense, we are all Magpies.

These paintings return to us the world as visualised by our childlike selves: mutable, sparking with potential, fluid in form.

– Jaideep Mehrotra. 2018


Please note: Images shown here may vary when viewed physically as metallic surfaces do not reproduce well in print or digital medium.


Media Gallery